Disc Jockeys make an impression by cleaning up their equipment appearance

disc jockey equipment appearance

Music Man DJ Console 1979

By Andy Ebon, “Wedding Marketing Expert”

Way back when, in the mid-1970′s, when Scott Foell and I founded Music Man Mobile DJ Service, off-the-shelf casing or consoles were not widely available for mobile disc jockeys. In order to look good, we had to design and construct our own. Having a partner who was an engineering genius didn’t hurt.

Scott designed and built a 1-piece console that he covered in black Formica. It looked stunning. It took a great deal of effort and money, but it was worth it. We always looked good.

Today, mobile DJ’s can buy from a wide assortment of industrial-style cases, carpeted consoles, and electronic equipment designed to fit in those units. One can buy big or modular enclosures, depending on specific needs for venue access, transportation, and size of crew (1 or more people).

In spite of availability of professional, clean disc jockey equipment, I am thoroughly amazed and perplexed at how many disc jockey entertainment services make an incredibly weak presentation.

Deficiencies I see
frequently, include:

  • Loose, unconcealed wires: From the customer’s point of view, it’s a mess. A guest should never be looking into the a jungle of wires.
  • Use of venue banquet tables, typically draped in white, for the purpose of placing a DJ console on it. COMMENT: To me, a DJ service should arrive self-contained. If a table is needed, to place equipment on, the DJ service should bring it. And, it should be consistent with the look of the gear, placed on it. At least, it should be skirted in black or fold-open facing should screen out the gear.
  • OPINION: The only requirements a DJ should require
    • Space to set up console and speakers
    • Electricity
disc jockey equipment appearance

Grundorf wrap-around DJ façade

Browsing the internet, I found many examples of facades and consoles that are both affordable, and look good.

Grundorf, manufactures an inexpensive, hinged-DJ façade (from IDJNOW.com) It wraps around gear that is not permanently mounted. Magically, it ‘cleans up the clutter’ for the eyes of  an event guest.

As well as façades, there are complete 1-piece consoles and stacked consoles (full width or podium width).

Any of those physical presentations provide the DJ a more permanent and polished look.

disc jockey equipment appearance

Naga 3-panel DJ facade from Dragon Frontboards

The second example is a disc jockey façade from Dragon Frontboards.  It is a simple, 3-panel façade. Dragon offers vast array of products, with many alternatives in size, look, colors, built-in video monitor support… you name it. 

There is no single
right answer

Disc Jockey services require various console configurations for different events. Individual needs for local markets or specific client and event needs will dictate what gear is use, how it’s organized, and presented.

This issue is not limited
to DJ Entertainers

Many wedding photographers carry lots of gear, and usually keeping it in the reception room for security reasons. Yet, often the gear in plain view, never addressing a clean way to stow it. Videographers have some of the same challenges. Finding unobtrusive places for hiding extra gear, out of view, is a problem. For both photographers and videographers, storing their valuable equipment in a room, down the hall, doesn’t address either security or quick availability.

Moral: It’s not enough to sound good and emcee effectively, if you want to earn top dollar and be referred, consistently. You must look good, too. When the wedding pictures come back and the DJ set up looks like a cobbled together set of road-cases on a banquet table, you are not at your best.

Brides and grooms are often oblivious to what goes on around them at a wedding. That’s no excuse. They will see it in the wedding pictures. Guests and family will see it at the event.

Don’t kid yourself: How you look counts… to guests, event managers, wedding planners, and catering managers. You will never know how many referrals you lose, because you’ll never hear about them.

%d bloggers like this: